About Me.

A Family Tree researcher for over 30 years and a blogger since 2010, I love to share what I find. This blog has opened up a new way to contact and keep in-touch with both family and friends. It mightn't always be genealogy related and you might not agree with my point of view but I want you to comment, ask questions and look upon this blog as 'friends having a chat'.
Enjoy!

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Researching Abroad, Day Two

Today it was all about Scottish, Irish and a bit of English records, wonderfully presented by Chris Paton. Chris is a professional genealogists, author, international speaker and a good bloke. Born in Northern Ireland, he now lives in Scotland.
Chris, busy writing.

Chris and I.

                                                    Chris, in presenter mode.
Chris presented four fantastic talks, starting with A beginner's guide to British and Irish genealogy. Now I don't class myself as a beginner but it is always great to revisit things and have them refreshed in your memory. You might also learn something new, I know I did. Chris gave an overview of important dates and while I had read about them, hearing them explained, made it gel.

Discover Scottish Church records was next and I feel that I'm finally getting an understanding of what happened in Scotland and why there mightn't be any records.

His next two talks were about Irish records, one dealing with online records, good for me as I don't see atrip to Ireland happening, soon. The next one was on land records and again, whilst I had read about the different divisions, having it explained made it sink in.

Heather from SAG, gave an overview of what we can find in their collections and how to access them.

Eric Kopittke presented the My Heritage talk, as Rosemary had a sore throat.

 
Living DNA had a short video on how they do their DNA tests, great as I am waiting on my results.

Dinner ended the day and it was good to sit and chat. Thank you to Alan Phillips, from Unlock The Past and Gould Genealogy for organising the two days.


Kay, from Teapot Genealogy.



The Gould Genealogy stall.

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Researching Abroad. Day One

Today was day one of the Unlock The Past, sponsored genealogy feast.
Part of the audience.



Today was German research, with Dirk Weissleder presenting four informative talks. I have German ancestors and the information Dirk gave, will help me go further with my research. Giving us the German words for the different records will be very useful.

Dirk is the President of the Federation of Family Associations. He is also a genealogy consultant and national chairman of the Deutsche Arbeisgemeinschaft genealogischer Verbande  www.dagv.org  This society is the umbrella organisation for genealogy and heraldry for Germany.


Kerry Farmer gave a great talk on DNA. I have heard Kerry give similar talks but today it started to sink in. While I don't know how many connections I will find, I'm am going to try another company and compare my results and maybe make a connection.


Rosemary Kopittke gave a presentation about My Heritage. I haven't look at this site but it sounds interesting.

It was good to catch up with friends and browse the stalls. I added to my collection of books.

Momento  photo books. They are stunning.

Sylvia from Families In British India Society.

Heather from SAG. Heather also presented a talk on what the society holds for European research.
 

 
The view from the window was of Old Government House, in Parramatta Park.

It was a wonderful day and I'll do it all again, tomorrow, when Chris Paton talks about Scottish and Irish research.

Bye for now,
Lilian,

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Two Interesting Websites

My second last subject for my diploma is how to organise a one-name study. These two websites have been given to us to help in our assignments and they are fun to 'play' with.



I had heard of freebdm but never used it. You enter the surname, the type of entry you are looking for, birth, marriage or death OR you can do all entries and get the lot. You also pick the time frame you want and then click search. You can do just how many or full which gives you the details. I have learnt so much from just entering a surname and looking for all records.

https://www.freebmd.org.uk/

The FreeBMD Database was last updated on Fri 4 Aug 2017 and currently contains 262,812,210 distinct records (336,300,128 total records).

World Names, is like the freedbm, except that you get a world wide distribution of the surname you are looking for, not just England. I was able to see the distribution of the two surnames, I'm starting on my one-name study. Both results were interesting, in that where I thought the name should be wasn't what came up, so I have a lot of research to do.

http://worldnames.publicprofiler.org/


Have a play and see what you can learn about your surname.

Bye for now,
Lilian.

Total Trivia: Clothes Pegs and Coat hangers.

Hanging the washing, this morning I got to thinking, Who invented both the clothes peg and the coat hanger and when? A search of Wikipedia gave me the answers.

Clothes pegs or clothes pins, the king used for hanging washing, were patented by  Jeremie Victor Opdebec in the early 19th  century.  This design was fashioned in one piece and didn't use a spring.

The design that we use, today was invented by David M Smith of Springfield, Vermont in 1853. This was done with a small spring, wedged between interlocking wooden (or now plastic) prongs.

In 1887, Solon E Moore improved the design, with what he called a 'coiled fulcrum', what is used in todays pegs.
A wooden peg made from a single piece of wood. Sometimes called a Dolly peg.
A wooden peg with the coiled fulcrum.
Some of the plastic pegs, available today.

So thank you to  Mr Opdebed,  Mr Smith and Mr Moore for the humble peg.




Now the coat hanger; several people are credited with this objects beginning. The shape, used today, is credited to O. A. North in 1869 or  Albert J Parkhouse, in 1903, then there is Christopher Cann, in 1876, he was an engineering student at Boston University. So to who ever invented the coat hanger, thank you, with out them our wardrobes would an untidy mess!


A collection of my coat hangers, from the sturdy wooden one, the skirt hanger, a padded one, one my mum made, (orange and white one) and two different wire ones.
 
Bye for now,
Lilian.

Sunday, 6 August 2017

Can we go back to our childhood home?


  from The Legal Genealogists posted an interesting blog  about going back to your childhood home, see the link below and it got me thinking about two of my childhood homes. One I know is demolished and villas are built on it the other, well I 'explored'.

http://www.legalgenealogist.com/2017/08/05/the-house-of-childhood/

I spent the first nine and a bit years growing up in Earle Street, Arncliffe. I remember it as a good place to live, in the small street there were at least 10 kids, of varying ages, not counting the teenagers. I felt safe, was able to go and play and my mum would know where I was. I think life was simpler then. I'm not going to say safer, just that as kids we simply didn't know about the 'bad'  stuff.

I remember that the two teenage boys, across the road, would race their billycarts down the street, turning at the bottom, just before the main road. The street runs between two very busy roads and they were busy back then too. I remember the day the electricity people put in two massive posts, to hold a transformer, blasting away at the sandstone rock and us kids hanging over the fences, watching. Good memories.


To me, as a child the yard was huge and had a slight slope in it and there were two large camphor laurel trees.  The back  part was fenced of and Tilly or Milly, the kangaroos lived there. I had a sandpit, we had a lemon tree and a chook yard and an outside toilet.
 



Me, as a cute young thing, sitting on the steps. You can see the window behind me.
Me and Tilly or Milly.
 
 
 
Fast forward to 2017 and the wonderful Google Street view and I nearly cried. I knew that there had been changes as years ago I went back, with our youngest, just to have a look. The wonderful patterned verandah had been tiled over with large brown square tiles but the stained glass window was still there.



The window is still there, the sandstone foundation is still the same and so is what I sat on but...
The fence is now bricks, the driveway looks the same and there are security bars on the windows. I searched for any real estate sales and found that it had been sold back in 2012 and that they had lodged plans to build four, two bedroom villas on the property. Hasn't happened, yet but the aerial view of number four, looks like they are doing something in the back yard, there.

BUT, having looked at the real estate page I did learn some things. It was built in 1910 and the land area is 797 square meters. I then went to Trove and just entered the address and found 61 articles about things that happened either in the street or to people living in the street. It made for interesting reading, everything from weddings, to obituaries, to the sad articles about the suicide of a young man, living in the street. I found the names of two of the houses, Aberdeen and Frauenstein. Would love to know which one was Aberdeen. Frauenstein was number four.

I wont go back and visit, this exercise has dulled my memories. The house looks old and tired, maybe it is time to say good-bye.

Would you go back and visit your childhood home?

Bye for now,
Lilian.